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Aerobic Landfill Bioreactors


Numerical Simulation of Landfill Bioreactors

Laboratory Models

Tank Treatment

Waste Composition

Tank Set-up

Summary

 

Tank Treatment:

1. Aerobic, Wet

  • Recirculation rate 20 ml/min
  • Aeration rate 3.5 L/min

2. Anaerobic, Wet

  • Recirculation rate 20 ml/min

3. Anaerobic, Dry

  • No water or air added

4. Anaerobic, Dry tank converted to Aerobic, Wet at 197 days

  • Recirculation rate 20 ml/min
  • Aeration rate 2.0 L/min

Waste Composition:

Component

Weight (%)*

 

Paper (mixed, cardboard)

19

Food Waste

12

Metal (aluminum, steel)

7.1

Glass

8.4

Plastic (bottles, bags)

8.0

Garden Waste

9.0

Other Waste (wood,rubble, textiles, rubber, leather)

10.5

Soil

26


*Assuming 150 kg/m3 density

 

Tank Set-up:

Summary:

Temperature:
Increases were seen initially but elevated temperatures could not be maintained by the microbiological activity in the tanks

Subsidence:
Aerobic, Wet tanks show more subsidence than the anaerobic tanks and have no odor

Gas Composition:
Oxygen consumption rates in the Aerobic, Wet tanks decreased over time, indicating depletion of available carbon. Methane production did not occur in anaerobic tanks until 280 days, probably due to low acidity or lack of inoculation. Rates of O2 consumption and CO2 generation can be predicted withe the T2LBM model.

Leachate:
Aerobic, wet tanks have significantly lower levels of metals, N, P, and TOC, and higher pH and Eh than the anaerobic tanks.

The laboratory studies combined with previous field studies demonstrate that landfills operated as Aerobic Bioreactors:


1) increase biodegradation rate,
2) increase subsidence,
3) reduce or eliminate need for leachate treatment,
4) decrease long-term liability and monitoring costs,
5) decrease leaching of metals and organic contaminants, and
6) decrease methane generation (Green House Gas).


Numerical Simulation of Landfill Bioreactors


For more information regarding this subject, please contact:

Sharon Borglin
510/486-7515
Email: seborglin@lbl.gov

Curt Oldenburg
510/486-7419
Email: cmoldenburg@lbl.gov

Terry Hazen
510/486-6223
Email: tchazen@lbl.gov

This work is supported by Laboratory Directed Research and Development Funds at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098.

 

 

 

 


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